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Max McKeown


  Male      English      Writer



About Author

Max McKeown (born in London, October 1969) is an English writer, consultant, and researcher specialising in innovation strategy, leadership and culture. He has written six influential books and conducts research with Warwick Business School (Young, 2008). He is a fellow of the RSA. He served on the Advisory Board for the Rollins Center for eBusiness. He earned his Masters in Business Administration and PhD from the Warwick Business School under the supervision of Professor David Wilson and Professor Sotirios Paroutis, who was in turn supervised by Andrew Pettigrew.

McKeown is an advocate of innovation culture. He also argues that failure can be positive for progress if it is viewed as part of learning (Chynoweth, 2010). He makes a distinction between change and progress, "change is inevitable but progress is not" (McKeown, 2008). His work described how 'creativity doesn't come from hiring the right people, but from creating the right conditions' (Buchanan & Huczynski, 2013, McKeown, 2008). He also argues that "reacting matters as much as planning" and that strategy is effective only when it shapes events in the real world (McKeown, 2011).

In Adaptability, a contribution to innovation literature he sets out four levels of adaptation that social groups can achieve. Collapsing is the end of the social group. Coping is survival 'without prosperity, pride or joy'. Thriving provides benefits that are worthwhile and desirable. The final level, Transcending overcomes the limits of the old system, allowing more for everyone. The three step model of Adaptability (RUN) involves (1) Recognition of required adaptation (2) Understanding of adaptation required (3) Necessary adaptation. He describes High Adaptability (Killer) Cultures – or HACKs – as supportive of self-renewal that nurture and develop the talent of what he refers to as High Adaptability, High Achievement individuals – or HAHAs – who learn to become stronger when faced with adversity as compared to Low Adaptability, Low Achievement individuals – or LALAs – who become increasingly inflexible when put under pressure (McKeown, 2013)...


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